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mis·take

(m-stk)

n.

1. An error or fault resulting from defective judgment, deficient knowledge, or carelessness.
2. A misconception or misunderstanding.
v. mis·took (m-stk), mis·tak·en (m-stkn), mis·tak·ing, mis·takes
v.tr.

1. To understand wrongly; misinterpret: mistook my politeness for friendliness.
2. To recognize or identify incorrectly: He mistook her for her sister.
v.intr.

To make a mistake; err.

[From Middle English mistaken, to misunderstand, from Old Norse mistaka, to take in error : mis-, wrongly; see mei-1 in Indo-European roots + taka, to take.]

mis·taker n.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2003. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

is

(z)

v.

Third person singular present indicative of be.

[Middle English, from Old English; see es- in Indo-European roots.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2003. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


is

Verb
third person singular of the present tense of be [Old English]

Collins Essential English Dictionary 2nd Edition 2006 © HarperCollins Publishers 2004, 2006

what

(hwt, hwt, wt, wt; hwt, wt when unstressed)

pron.

1.

a. Which thing or which particular one of many: What are you having for dinner? What did she say?
b. Which kind, character, or designation: What are these objects?
c. One of how much value or significance: What are possessions to a dying man?
2.

a. That which; the thing that: Listen to what I tell you.
b. Whatever thing that: come what may.
3. Informal Something: I’ll tell you what.
4. Nonstandard Which, who, or that: It’s the poor what gets the blame.
adj.

1. Which one or ones of several or many: What college are you attending? You should know what musical that song is from.
2. Whatever: They soon repaired what damage had been done.
3. How great; how astonishing: What a fool!
adv.

How much; in what respect; how: What does it matter?
conj.

That: I don’t know but what I’ll go.
interj.

1. Used to express surprise, incredulity, or other strong and sudden excitement.
2. Chiefly British Used as a tag question, often to solicit agreement.

Idioms:

what for Informal

A scolding or strong reprimand: The teacher gave the tardy student what for.
what have you

What remains and need not be mentioned: a room full of chairs, lamps, radios, and what have you.
what if

1. What would occur if; suppose that.
2. What does it matter if.
what it takes

The necessary expertise or qualities needed for success: She has what it takes to be a doctor.
what’s what Informal

The fundamentals and details of a situation or process; the true state or condition.
what with

Taking into consideration; because of: “I’ve often wondered why some good crime writer . . . hasn’t taken up with New Orleans, what with its special raffishness, its peculiar flavor of bonhomie and a slightly suspect charm” Walker Percy.

[Middle English, from Old English hwæt; see kwo- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: When what is the subject of a clause, it takes a singular verb if the word or phrase that completes the sentence (the complement) is singular, as in I see what seems to be a dead tree. It is plural if a plural noun or noun phrase completes the sentence, as in He sometimes makes what seem to be gestures of reconciliation.·Clauses with what as either subject or object may themselves be the subject of a sentence, and sometimes it is difficult to decide whether the verb of the main clause should be singular or plural. When the what in the what-clause is the object of the verb and the complement of the main clause is singular, the main verb is always singular: What they wanted was a home of their own; when the complement of the main sentence is plural, the verb is most often plural: What American education needs are smaller classes, though one also encounters sentences such as What the candidate gave the audience was the same old empty promises. When what is the subject of a what-clause that is the subject of a main clause, there is greater variation in usage. When the verb of the what-clause and the complement of the main clause are both plural or both singular, the number of the verb of the main clause generally agrees with them. When the verb in the what-clause is singular and the complement in the main clause is plural, one finds both singular and plural verbs being used. Sentences similar to both of the following are found in respected writers: What drives me crazy is her frequent tantrums; What bothers him are the discrepancies in their accounts. When the complement of the main clause consists of two or more nouns, the verb of the main clause is generally singular if the nouns are singular and plural if they are plural: What pleases the voters is his honesty and his willingness to take on difficult issues; On entering the harbor what first meet the eye are luxurious yachts and colorful villas. Occasionally the choice of a singular or plural verb may be used to convey a difference in meaning. In the sentence What excite him most are money and power, the implication is that money and power are separable goals; in What excites him most is money and power, the implication is that money and power are inextricably bound together. See Usage Note at which.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2003. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

I 1

()

pron.

Used to refer to oneself as speaker or writer.
n. pl. I’s

The self; the ego.

[Middle English, from Old English ic; see eg in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: The question of when to use nominative forms of the personal pronouns (for example, I, she, they) and when to use objective forms (for example, me, her, them) has always created controversy among grammarians and uncertainty among speakers and writers. There is no problem when the pronoun stands alone with a single verb or preposition: every native speaker says I (not me) read the book; They told him (not he); The company bought a computer for us (not we); and so forth. But the decision is more problematic in other environments.·When pronouns are joined with other nouns or pronouns by and or or, there is a widespread tendency to use the objective form even when the phrase is the subject of the sentence: Tom and her are not speaking to each other. This usage is natural in colloquial speech, but the nominative forms should be used in formal speech and writing: John and she (not her) will be giving the talk.·When pronouns joined by a conjunction occur as the object of a preposition such as between, according to, or like, many people use the nominative form where the traditional grammatical rule would require the objective; they say between you and I rather than between you and me, and so forth. Many critics have seen this construction as originating in a hypercorrection, whereby speakers who have been taught to say It is I instead of It is me come further to assume that correctness also requires between you and I in place of between you and me. This explanation of the tendency cannot be the whole story, inasmuch as the phrase between you and I occurs in Shakespeare, centuries before the prescriptive rules requiring It is I and the like were formulated. But the between you and I construction is nonetheless widely regarded as a marker of grammatical ignorance and is best avoided.·In other contexts the traditional insistence that the nominative form be used is more difficult to defend. The objective form sounds most natural when the pronoun is not grammatically related to an accompanying verb or preposition. Thus, in response to the question “Who cut down the cherry tree?” we more colloquially say “Me,” even though some grammarians have argued that I must be correct here by analogy to the form “I did”; and few speakers would accept that the sentence What, me worry? is improved if it is changed to What, I worry? The prescriptive insistence that the nominative be used in such a construction is grammatically questionable and is apt to lead to almost comical pedantries.·There is also a widespread tendency to use the objective form when a pronoun is used as a subject together with a noun in apposition, as in Us engineers were left without technical support. In formal speech or writing the nominative we would be preferable here. But when the pronoun itself appears in apposition to a subject noun phrase, the use of the nominative form may sound pedantic in a sentence such as The remaining members of the admissions committee, namely we, will have to meet next week. A writer who is uncomfortable about using the objective us here would be best advised to rewrite the sentence to avoid the difficulty. See Usage Notes at be, but, we.

I 2

1. The symbol for the element iodine.
2. Electricity The symbol for current.
3. also i The symbol for the Roman numeral 1.

i 1 or I ()

n. pl. i’s or I’s also is or Is

1. The ninth letter of the modern English alphabet.
2. Any of the speech sounds represented by the letter i.
3. The ninth in a series.
4. Something shaped like the letter I.

i 2

The symbol for imaginary unit.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2003. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

made

(md)

v.

Past tense and past participle of make.
adj.

1. Produced or manufactured by constructing, shaping, or forming. Often used in combination: handmade lace; ready-made suits.
2. Produced or created artificially: bought some made goods at the local store.
3. Having been invented; contrived: These made excuses of yours just won’t wash.
4. Assured of success: a made man.

Idiom:

made for

Perfectly suited for: They’re made for each other.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2003. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

sigh

Verb
1. to draw in and audibly let out a deep breath as an expression of sadness, tiredness, longing, or relief
2. to make a sound resembling this
3. sigh for to long for
4. to say (something) with a sigh
Noun
the act or sound of sighing [Old English sīcan]

Collins Essential English Dictionary 2nd Edition 2006 © HarperCollins Publishers 2004, 2006

Wo Ke Yi……. pei ni chu kan xin xin… lol.

Now Playing — 蔡旻佑-我可以

I always HATE to let some’_’ know that ‘_’ is the root of everything.

*edit addenum — catch what’s behind the top text… subtly hidden. that is if you care and if you can*

My heart looks like this… puzzled.

I’m Sorry. AC.

Or your friendly ‘neighbourhood’ eXP

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